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UK reviewing Muslim Brotherhood status: Cameron

British Prime Minister David Cameron and President El-Sisi hold a press conference in Downing Street, 5 November 2015. Photo: Georgina Coupe, Crown Copyright
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British Prime Minister David Cameron and President El-Sisi hold a press conference in Downing Street, 5 November 2015. Photo: Georgina Coupe, Crown Copyright

British Prime Minister David Cameron said today [5 November 2015] the UK is urgently reviewing the status of Muslim Brotherhood and will publish its decision later this year.

Cameron spoke to the news media while welcoming Egyptian President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi at Number 10 Downing Street.

Asked when Britain would review its policy toward Muslim Brotherhood, described by the reporter as “the mother of all terroristic groups,” Cameron replied, “What we do in Britain is we judge people by whether they are inside the law or outside the law. And if people are fomenting violence then they are breaking the law, and the law should come down on them.”

Referring to his talks with President El-Sisi, Cameron added the British government review “into the Muslim Brotherhood, which we discussed today,” will be published later this year.” He did not specify a date.

“I think you’ll see—as you’re already seeing in Britain—a much more robust approach against extremism.”

This approach, he added, was directed “against extremism of all kinds, and against those extremists that stop just short of endorsing violence, but nonetheless those extremists whose worldview encourages people to pursue a path of violence, and that is very much our approach here in the UK.”

Cameron rebutted criticism that British foreign policy contributed to the rise of Daesh (aka Islamic State, ISIL or ISIS) terror franchise.

“People who say that the problem with Islamic extremism, and the problem of Islamist extremist violence, was caused either by Iraq or by action in Libya or elsewhere; the fundamental problem they have to confront is this: that one of the biggest acts of Islamist extremist violent terrorism was of course the attack on the Twin Towers in New York, which preceded those events. In the case of Iraq by two years; in the case of Libya by many more years.

“That came first, and I would argue that the problem of extremist Islamism and violence has been a growing problem, and it’s a problem which is effectively a battle that’s taking place within Islam.

“I know, and you know, that Islam is a religion of peace; a religion followed by millions in our world as a guide to their life and a source of faith, and a source of strength. But there is a minority of a minority, as it were, that have taken the tenets of this religion and poisoned them, and turned them into a perverse narrative that justifies suicide bombs and killing and maiming, and all the things that IS are doing—so‑called IS—are doing in Syria and Iraq. And indeed, that Islamist extremist terrorists are doing in other countries of the world.”

Cameron said there was a universal need to combat “the narrative of Islamist extremism”  rather than thinking that it was caused in some way by the actions of others. “The Twin Towers, the actions of Al-Qaeda; that happened many years before the events you were referring to.”

Author: Editor

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